Warbirds and Airshows
By David D Jackson

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Fort Barrancas, FL  Ft. Concho, TX   Ft. Clatsop, OR   Fort Greenville, OH   Ft. Hawkins, GA   Fort Jefferson, FL   Fort Jefferson, OH    Ft. Langley, BC   Ft. Martin Scott, TX   Fort Morgan, AL   Fort Moultrie, SC   Ft. Pitt, PA    Ft. Recovery, OH   Fort Sumter, SC   Ft. Wayne, IN           

  Historic Forts
Fort Morgan
, Baldwin, AL - October 18, 2012
Fort Morgan was one of the series of Coastal Fortifications built after the War of 1812 and guard the entrance into Mobile Bay and was completed in 1833.  A previous timber fortification built on this site in 1814 was called Fort Bowyer at which two battles were fought between the British and Americans.  During the Civil War Fort Morgan fell into Confederate control in January of 1861 and remained under its control until two weeks after the Battle of Mobile Bay when the fort surrendered after being bombarded by Union artillery for two weeks.  As with the other series of coastal forts on the Gulf and East coast it served right up to the end of WWII, helping to guard the entrance to Mobile Bay from possible foreign attack.  During WWII the threat of German U-boats, which actually did prowl the Gulf of Mexico and sink many US cargo ships and oil tankers, Fort Monroe stood on guard to prevent their intrusion into Mobile Bay.  After WWII the intercontinental bomber and missiles made Fort Morgan obsolete after 112 Years.

Fort Morgan is owned and operated by the State of Alabama and is at the the west end of the barrier island Gulf Shores is on.  Just head west out of Gulf Shores for a short 25 minute drive and you will be there.  Also one can take a ferry from the site over to Dauphin Island and visit Fort Morgan's sister fort, Fort Gaines. 


Entry into the fort is through this passage way.


Once through the outer wall one passes through this dry moat.  For a ground force attacking the fort from the land side once over the first barrier of defense it would then have to cross this open moat.


Looking east at the dry moat.


The entrance to the parade ground and gun emplacements.




Another look at the moat and the wall of the inner fort.




The next series of photos were taken from the foot of the wall facing the Gulf of Mexico working from east to west.








Looking out to the Gulf of Mexico.  The entrance to Mobile Bay is to the right.  The heavy earth works that one finds at this style off fort was designed to absorb cannon shells fired from attacking ships while at the same time providing protected space for men, equipment and ammunition.


Looking north into Mobile Bay over the north wall we see an oil rig just off shore.


Looking at the former gun emplacements along the west wall.


Looking at the parade ground of Fort Morgan from up above.


The stairways are very steep inside the fort.


 



The Fort Morgan Museum.


Just to the east of the original fort are gun batteries that were added at later dates for more and larger guns.  It was these batteries that were manned by the US Coastal Artillery up through the end of WWII.  On one hand the Coastal Artillery personnel had it made as they were not shipped overseas to combat, but they did have to do battle with boredom, hot and humid weather with no air conditioning in the summer, and mosquitoes, among other inconveniences.  One needs to remember that the development of the island into a tourist trap is recent.  During WWII there would have been a few residents of the island but most of it would have been undeveloped with minimal amenities. 


Another battery farther east. 


 

Fort Barrancas, FL  Ft. Concho, TX   Ft. Clatsop, OR   Fort Greenville, OH   Ft. Hawkins, GA   Fort Jefferson, FL   Fort Jefferson, OH    Ft. Langley, BC   Ft. Martin Scott, TX   Fort Morgan, AL   Fort Moultrie, SC   Ft. Pitt, PA    Ft. Recovery, OH   Fort Sumter, SC   Ft. Wayne, IN         
 

 


 
Home  Indiana Museums    Indiana Tanks on Outside Display   The Beginning    Revisions   First Flight of P-38F Glacier Girl  
USS Theodore Roosevelt    WWII Aircraft Manufacturing Sites    Gateguards
 2007 Airshows   2008 Airshows  22009 Airshows   2010 Airshows    2011 Airshows    2012 Airshows   2013 Airshows   2014 Airshows    2015 Airshows  2016 Airshows    2017 Airshows 
Aviation Museums of the Pacific Northwest
   Display Helicopter Locations   CAL FIRE   PV-2 Harpoon Photos     F6F Hellcat Photos
   Warbird Sightings   WWII US Air-Air Victories   Guest Photos    Indiana Warbirds   Featured Photos  Other Items   Links

Historic Sites   Historic Forts   Historic Texas Independence Sites   Pre-Historic Sites   Historic Manhattan Project Sites   GM Heritage Center


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